Blog

Yay for clean(er) air!  Celebrate the return of hiker-friendly weather by joining Environment Montana and your neighbors for a Hike for the Places We Love!  Bring your kiddos, your walking shoes, and your love of public lands to Waterworks Hill on Wednesday, 9/27 at 4 P.M.

As the summer comes to a close, we share some of our favorite pictures from our Trailhead Tour. 

Friday morning at 5 a.m. The sky is dark, but the roads are clear and I’m just a few miles away from my AirBnb in Murfreesboro, Tennessee — valuables, pup and nourishment in tow. After 18 hours of driving, I’m exhausted but grateful to be out of harm’s way.

Our children need safe drinking water – especially at school where they go to learn and play each day.

Bees pollinate 71 of 100 crops that supply 90% of the world’s food and in the past decade, beekeepers have been reporting an average loss of 30% of all honeybee colonies each winter.

For those of us on the Environment America clean energy team, the solar eclipse is a powerful reminder of the progress solar energy has made, and how much further we need to go. When the last solar eclipse occurred 38 years ago, solar panels were niche products, and electricity generated from the sun made up a negligible piece of our electrical grid.

Ten short years ago, solar panels were mere novelties. Today, they’re a dominant force in America’s energy landscape, and poised for even more growth in the years ahead. Coupled with huge advances in wind energy, battery storage, electric vehicles and energy efficiency, it’s getting clearer than ever that moving to a future powered entirely by clean, renewable energy is as feasible at it is necessary.

America is poised to dramatically accelerate its shift away from fossil fuels, and Montana can benefit if we enact smart policies.

Over the past couple of weeks, a much-needed conversation about moving to 100 percent renewable energy has exploded into the national spotlight. Unfortunately, the focus has largely been on personal disputes and deep-in-the-weeds debates among folks who basically agree instead of a productive conversation about how we can get there.

Last week, we had the opportunity to visit the site of Glacier’s infamous 2003 Robert wildfire. Scientists predict that megafires will become more commonplace as a result of climate change.